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Seneca indians

Collection by Kathleen Traucht

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Kathleen Traucht
Iroquois--supposedly my Dads side of the family has an Iroquois connection. Native American Beauty, Native American Photos, American Indian Art, Native American Tribes, Native American History, Native Indian, Native Art, Indian Tribes, Art Indien

photos tribus indiennes

blog sur le loup,les indiens d'amérique,Terre Mère. Quelle Terre allons nous laisser à nos enfant?

Mohawk, Seneca, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga and Tuscarora. Proud of my Seneca blood. Native American Wisdom, Native American Tribes, Native American History, American Indians, Indian Tribes, Seneca Nation, Seneca Indians, Woodland Indians, Iroquois

History of the Iroquois Confederacy - Iroquois Valley Farmland REIT

As a fairness disclosure to the native peoples that inhabited these lands before us, we did not take the name of “Iroquois” with a particular historical or cultural viewpoint. The name of our company was instead...

Historic Iroquois and Wabanaki Beadwork: The Iroquois and Wild West Shows Native American Pictures, Native American Women, Native American History, American Indians, American Symbols, Woodland Indians, Iroquois, Native Indian, First Nations

The Iroquois and Wild West Shows #2

http://www.gerrybiron.com/ Here is another group of nineteenth century images of Mohawks who may have been involved in the Wild West shows. The beadwork on their clothing is distinctly different from that on my earlier post on this topic. That first group was likely from Akwesasne. Some of the images in this group are identified as coming from Caughnawaga (Kahnawake) and I suspect the beading style here is particular to the Mohawks from that Reserve. All the images below are late nineteenth…

Learn about the Clan System of the Iroquois Confederacy. Native American Spirituality, Native American Symbols, Native American History, Native American Indians, Haida Kunst, Mohawk Indians, Woodland Indians, Iroquois, Medicine Wheel

Social Studies | Clans of the Iroquois Confederacy

Social Studies | Clans of the Iroquois Confederacy - Grade 6 Social Studies

Historic Iroquois and Wabanaki Beadwork. – Circa 1860 tintype of two Seneca women in their traditional dress. Their collars are decorated with silver brooches. Native American Clothing, Native American Beauty, Native American Tribes, Native American History, American Fashion, Seneca Indians, Woodland Indians, Black Indians, Iroquois

Historic Iroquois and Wabanaki Beadwork

In this blog posting we will examine some of the variations in historic 18th and 19th century Iroquois regalia through old paintings, photographs and examples of early material culture. Since first contact with Europeans, artists have depicted the Haudenosaunee wearing diverse attire; the images below are by no means a complete visual record of those that exist but should suffice in this brief review. The dictionary defines “traditional” as “existing in or as part of a tradition; long…

Free archive of historic Native American Indian Tribes Photographs, Pictures and Images. Photographs promote the Native American Tribes culture Native American Longhouse, Native American Tribes, Native American History, Indian Tribes, Quebec, Seneca Indians, Woodland Indians, Les Religions, Iroquois

History of the Iroquois Indians

Iroquois Longhouse - Established in either 1142 or 1451, the Five Nations Iroquois confederacy consisted of the Mohawks, the Oneidas, the Onondagas, the Cayugas, and the Senecas. When the Tuscaroras joined in 1712 the union adapted the name Haudenosaunee, which translates to mean “six separate Indian nations”. In treaties and other colonial documents they were known as the “Six Nations.”

Iroquois Haudenosaunee village including a bark longhouse and wigwams typical of the Tuscarora, Mohawk, Onondaga, Oneida and Seneca tribes of the Six Nations Confederacy found in the Northeast United States and parts of Canada. Algonquin Indian, Indian Project, Woodland Indians, Aboriginal Culture, Indian Village, Native American Indians, Seneca Indians, Native Indian, First Nations

Iroquois Dwellings Iroquois village including a bark longhouse and wigwams typical of the Tuscarora, Mohawk, Onondaga, Oneida and Seneca tribes found in the Northeast United States and parts of Canada.

Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations September 2020 Washington, DC Native American Clothing, Native American Artifacts, Native American Beading, Native American Tribes, Woodland Indians, Native Design, First Nations, Traditional Dresses, Silk Ribbon

Seneca woman's outfit, ca.1830-1870 New York Cotton cloth, silk ribbon, dye, silver, copper alloy brooches, glass beads, cotton thread, hide, porcupine quill, glass beads, sinew, wool Photo by Earnest Amoroso #NMAI 9469, 20/609, 6/1097 Exhibition open Sept 21!

Jonathan Smith artwork for Osprey publishers' 'Tribes of the Iroquois Confederacy'. Native American Warrior, Native American Tribes, Native American History, African History, American Indians, Indian Tribes, Native Indian, Woodland Indians, Eskimo

George Washington "Town Destroyer"

By 1779, George Washington had already earned the famous moniker "Father of His Country." But the Iroquois Indians of the time bestowed on Washington another, not-so-flattering epithet: Conotocarious, or "Town Destroyer." This lesser-known title also had its origins in 1779, when General Washington ordered what at the time was the largest-ever campaign against the Indians in North America. After suffering for nearly two years from Iroquois raids on the Colonies' northern frontier, Washington…